• The Real Science of Forensics

    In this episode of SciShow, we’re going to investigate a murder. But first, we’re going to have to learn all about forensics, the use of science in criminal law -- and the real-life version is a little different from what you might see on TV. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhe...

    published: 02 Oct 2015
  • History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science.mp4

    History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science. From its beginnings to CODIS. The Timothy Spencer Case, DNA Data Banks, Paul B. Ferrara, Innocence Project, and Early Backlogs, ect.

    published: 06 May 2012
  • Two-Minute Science Lesson: How Forensic DNA Testing Works

    An overview of how forensic DNA testing can identify individuals and overturn wrongful convictions. With Innocence Project Case Director Huy Dao.

    published: 21 Jul 2011
  • DNA Analysis

    Please visit our website at http://www.nfstc.org DNA is life's blueprint, a molecule that encodes genetic instructions used in the development of all known living organisms and viruses. But how is DNA used in the field of forensic science? NFSTC presents "DNA Analysis," a brief explanation of what DNA is, how it functions, and the multi-step Forensic DNA Analysis process.

    published: 10 Jun 2014
  • Forensic Science The Dark Side of Forensic DNA Documentary

    published: 19 Jul 2016
  • Inside the Crime Lab: Forensic Biology DNA Unit

    The Forensic Biology Unit of the Denver Police Crime Lab examines evidence recovered from crime scenes for potential biological matter. They identify biological fluids, then take swabs or cuttings from the evidence and process them for analysis. Cases that test positive in the Forensic Biology Unit go on to forensic DNA analysis. The goal of the DNA Unit is to develop DNA profiles from items of evidence and compare them to known DNA profiles from crime investigations.

    published: 23 Oct 2016
  • How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? KS3 animation from Activate 3 Kerboodle

    Explaining DNA: how forensic investigators use DNA fingerprinting at a crime scene to identify the culprit. Find this and more KS3 animations on Activate 3 Kerboodle: Lessons, Resources and Assessment. Find out more about Activate at www.oxfordsecondary.co.uk/activate.

    published: 30 Oct 2014
  • How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times

    Before DNA testing, prosecutors relied on less sophisticated forensic techniques, including microscopic hair analysis, to put criminals behind bars. But how reliable was hair analysis? Produced by: Retro Report Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1jwyfLt Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytimes Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes/ Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of th...

    published: 19 May 2014
  • Exploring bias in forensic DNA profiling | Dan Krane | TEDxDayton

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The science of DNA profiling is sound, but much of what passes as DNA profiling is not scientific. Many testing labs resist interpreting evidence samples without having knowledge of a suspect's reference DNA profile. Blind interpretation of test results is possible and would greatly increase the reliability of the statistical weights given to DNA profile matches in some cases. Dan is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Wright State University where he has been a faculty member since 1993 and where he currently serves as the President of the Faculty. He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree for a double major in Biology and Chemistry from John Carroll University, and a Ph.D. in Bioche...

    published: 12 Jan 2015
  • 14 Amazing Forensic Science Techniques

    Here are 14 of the most amazing science techniques and technology that lets us carbon date and even do age progression! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7. Ballistics This side of science involves everything that has to do with the flight, behavior, effects, and launching of projectiles such as gravity bombs and rockets but when most people say ballistics they’re referring to bullets. Ballistics is broken down into four main categories. These are internal ballistics, transitional ballistics, external ballistics, and terminal ballistics. In the field of forensics, ballistics is used to analyze the bullet itself and its impact to see if the information found can be used in a court of law. 6. DNA Sequencer This scientific device is used to help figure out the order in which...

    published: 09 Nov 2016
  • This Was the Birth of DNA Profiling

    In 1983, police in Leicestershire, England struggle to make their case - until they join forces with scientists, who are just discovering the potential of DNA profiling.

    published: 05 Jun 2012
  • Analysing forensic evidence | The Laboratory

    Dr Angela Gallop is chief executive at Forensic Access and a renowned forensic scientist. She has worked on many high-profile forensic investigations - including the murder of Stephen Lawrence - where painstaking laboratory analysis on trace evidence taken from the scene of a crime helped to provide key evidence in court. She reveals the variety of evidence investigated in the laboratory, from textile fibres, blood stain patterns and DNA profiling, and explains how lab analysis on evidence in the Coastal Path murder case helped to secure a conviction in court. Skip to: 0:50 Analysing textile fibres 1:55 Blood spatter and blood pattern analysis 4:05 DNA profiling Part of Forensics: the anatomy of crime exhibition: http://wellcomecollection.org/forensics Follow us on Twitter: http://twit...

    published: 28 May 2015
  • The Case Against DNA Evidence | FRONTLINE

    Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW DNA evidence is the gold standard in many criminal cases. Most jurors and often the court of public opinion often believe if you can trace a crime back to a person's DNA, that person is caught red handed. But DNA evidence might not be as reliable as you think. FRONTLINE reporter Katie Worth takes you inside the case against DNA. Graphics by FableVision Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline Google+: https://plus.google.com/+frontline/posts FRONTLINE is streaming more than 180 films online, for free here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE's YouTube channel is provided by the Knight Foundation. FRONTLINE is made possible by PBS and CPB. Major support is provided by The John D. and C...

    published: 24 Jun 2015
  • The Power of Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy - Adventures in Genomics

    In forensics, sometimes samples are so degraded that traditional DNA extractions and methods may not work. Jacques and Irene with Mitch Holland explain how high-throughput sequencing is helping us realize the power of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy — ultimately leading to the solving of more crimes. Used to identify the remains of Tsar Nicholas Romanov II, you’ll see how MtDNA heteroplasmy can now be used to routinely, detect, resolve and report using NGS technology, benefitting the forensics community for years to come. Subscribe to Illumina: http://bit.ly/IlluminaYouTube Links: Mitch Holland at Penn State, Eberly College of Science, Forensic Science – http://forensics.psu.edu/research/dr.-mitchell-holland Penn State University www.psu.edu For more info on applications in forensics –...

    published: 18 Feb 2016
  • Killer Forensics - S02E06 ''DNA: The Truth Within''

    Five cases solved by DNA evidence.

    published: 09 Jul 2015
  • How does DNA fingerprinting work? - Naked Science Scrapbook

    How do we tell people apart by using their DNA? From murder investigations to paternity testing, DNA fingerprinting is an essential tool in the modern world. But how is it carried out? Find out in the latest Naked Science Scrapbook!More videos and podcasts from http://www.thenakedscientists.com

    published: 27 Oct 2011
The Real Science of Forensics

The Real Science of Forensics

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:24
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2015
  • views: 497318
videos
In this episode of SciShow, we’re going to investigate a murder. But first, we’re going to have to learn all about forensics, the use of science in criminal law -- and the real-life version is a little different from what you might see on TV. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/04/fbi-plans-have-52-million-photos-its-ngi-face-recognition-database-next-year http://www.alternet.org/story/153664/5_things_you_should_know_about_the_fbi's_massive_new_biometric_database http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/13/us/facial-recognition-software-moves-from-overseas-wars-to-local-police.html http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/15/opinion/how-the-fbi-uses-facial-recognition-analysis.html?_r=2 http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/8/5982727/face-wreck-how-advanced-tech-comes-up-short-for-police http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/genetic/dna-evidence.htm http://www.scientific.org/tutorials/articles/riley/riley.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/20205874 http://www.mlo-online.com/articles/201404/str-typing-method-and-applications.php http://www.cstl.nist.gov/strbase/pub_pres/Butler_BiotechniquesSuppl_Oct2007.pdf http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/facial-recognition1.htm http://www.mitchpileggi.net/Deep_Background/resources/forensics/bodies.htm https://books.google.com/books?id=adKcM055ERoC&pg=PT265 http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f02/web2/wcarroll.html http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/43078/stop-believing-tvs-lies-the-real-truth-about-enhancing-images/ http://nzic.org.nz/ChemProcesses/biotech/12A.pdf
https://wn.com/The_Real_Science_Of_Forensics
History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science.mp4

History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science.mp4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 46:49
  • Updated: 06 May 2012
  • views: 44662
videos
History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science. From its beginnings to CODIS. The Timothy Spencer Case, DNA Data Banks, Paul B. Ferrara, Innocence Project, and Early Backlogs, ect.
https://wn.com/History_Channel_On_The_Early_Implementation_Of_Dna_In_Forensic_Science.Mp4
Two-Minute Science Lesson: How Forensic DNA Testing Works

Two-Minute Science Lesson: How Forensic DNA Testing Works

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:55
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2011
  • views: 34943
videos
An overview of how forensic DNA testing can identify individuals and overturn wrongful convictions. With Innocence Project Case Director Huy Dao.
https://wn.com/Two_Minute_Science_Lesson_How_Forensic_Dna_Testing_Works
DNA Analysis

DNA Analysis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:47
  • Updated: 10 Jun 2014
  • views: 14328
videos
Please visit our website at http://www.nfstc.org DNA is life's blueprint, a molecule that encodes genetic instructions used in the development of all known living organisms and viruses. But how is DNA used in the field of forensic science? NFSTC presents "DNA Analysis," a brief explanation of what DNA is, how it functions, and the multi-step Forensic DNA Analysis process.
https://wn.com/Dna_Analysis
Forensic Science The Dark Side of Forensic DNA Documentary

Forensic Science The Dark Side of Forensic DNA Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 44:37
  • Updated: 19 Jul 2016
  • views: 579
videos
https://wn.com/Forensic_Science_The_Dark_Side_Of_Forensic_Dna_Documentary
Inside the Crime Lab: Forensic Biology DNA Unit

Inside the Crime Lab: Forensic Biology DNA Unit

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:39
  • Updated: 23 Oct 2016
  • views: 1202
videos
The Forensic Biology Unit of the Denver Police Crime Lab examines evidence recovered from crime scenes for potential biological matter. They identify biological fluids, then take swabs or cuttings from the evidence and process them for analysis. Cases that test positive in the Forensic Biology Unit go on to forensic DNA analysis. The goal of the DNA Unit is to develop DNA profiles from items of evidence and compare them to known DNA profiles from crime investigations.
https://wn.com/Inside_The_Crime_Lab_Forensic_Biology_Dna_Unit
How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? KS3 animation from Activate 3 Kerboodle

How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? KS3 animation from Activate 3 Kerboodle

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:08
  • Updated: 30 Oct 2014
  • views: 95907
videos
Explaining DNA: how forensic investigators use DNA fingerprinting at a crime scene to identify the culprit. Find this and more KS3 animations on Activate 3 Kerboodle: Lessons, Resources and Assessment. Find out more about Activate at www.oxfordsecondary.co.uk/activate.
https://wn.com/How_Is_Dna_Fingerprinting_Used_To_Identify_A_Criminal_Ks3_Animation_From_Activate_3_Kerboodle
How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times

How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:57
  • Updated: 19 May 2014
  • views: 23946
videos
Before DNA testing, prosecutors relied on less sophisticated forensic techniques, including microscopic hair analysis, to put criminals behind bars. But how reliable was hair analysis? Produced by: Retro Report Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1jwyfLt Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytimes Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes/ Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times http://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
https://wn.com/How_Dna_Changed_The_World_Of_Forensics_|_Retro_Report_|_The_New_York_Times
Exploring bias in forensic DNA profiling | Dan Krane | TEDxDayton

Exploring bias in forensic DNA profiling | Dan Krane | TEDxDayton

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:05
  • Updated: 12 Jan 2015
  • views: 9918
videos
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The science of DNA profiling is sound, but much of what passes as DNA profiling is not scientific. Many testing labs resist interpreting evidence samples without having knowledge of a suspect's reference DNA profile. Blind interpretation of test results is possible and would greatly increase the reliability of the statistical weights given to DNA profile matches in some cases. Dan is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Wright State University where he has been a faculty member since 1993 and where he currently serves as the President of the Faculty. He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree for a double major in Biology and Chemistry from John Carroll University, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the Cell and Molecular Biology Department at the Pennsylvania State University in 1990. Dan is also the president and a co-founder of Forensic Bioinformatic Services Inc., where he has overseen the development and implementation of software designed to automatically and objectively review STR DNA testing results. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
https://wn.com/Exploring_Bias_In_Forensic_Dna_Profiling_|_Dan_Krane_|_Tedxdayton
14 Amazing Forensic Science Techniques

14 Amazing Forensic Science Techniques

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:49
  • Updated: 09 Nov 2016
  • views: 33252
videos
Here are 14 of the most amazing science techniques and technology that lets us carbon date and even do age progression! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7. Ballistics This side of science involves everything that has to do with the flight, behavior, effects, and launching of projectiles such as gravity bombs and rockets but when most people say ballistics they’re referring to bullets. Ballistics is broken down into four main categories. These are internal ballistics, transitional ballistics, external ballistics, and terminal ballistics. In the field of forensics, ballistics is used to analyze the bullet itself and its impact to see if the information found can be used in a court of law. 6. DNA Sequencer This scientific device is used to help figure out the order in which the four bases of DNA are arranged in in a specific sample of DNA. For those of you that don’t remember the four bases from high school biology, they are guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine. Crime lab technicians and forensic scientists alike use a DNA sequencer when their DNA sample is too deteriorated in order to get a special DNA pattern that can aid in identifying the criminal. This special DNA pattern is called a “read”. 5. Hair Analysis One of the key elements that usually ends up putting criminals in jail is something that they’ve managed to completely overlook. That one small detail that plays a crucial part in their conviction is DNA. DNA evidence can range from bodily fluids such as blood or seminal fluids and fingerprints. However, clothing fibers and hair are just as important. The average person loses around 60-100 hairs per day and there’s no way you could keep track of where they fall. This works in favor of the forensics team. It was recently announced that human hair protein could potentially replace DNA as a key tool in forensics because of special markers that could allow the hair to distinguish an individual from a large group of people, say one million. 4. Polymerase Chain Reaction Abbreviated as PCR, the polymerase chain reaction technique was created by Kary Mullis back in the 1980’s and has gone on to be used in many different applications such as molecular biology and forensic science. Basically what PCR does is that it takes a single copy of DNA and replicates it around thousands to millions of times enough to where forensic scientists are able to successfully test it to match the DNA evidence of the potential suspect. This was a major breakthrough for cases that didn’t have enough DNA evidence to solve their cases and allowed these cases to be solved decades after they were committed. 3. Forensic Facial Reconstruction The first time a facial reconstruction was done was back in 1883 and then again in 1895. This technique combines several different fieldsー anthropology, anatomy, osteology, forensic science, and artistry in order to help solve the identity of someone that isn’t known by using their skeletal remains. This technique is quite controversial as it does prove to be somewhat problematic. Facial tissue thickness is the main issue that plagues this method but also the methodological standardization of the individual’s facial features. Even though it’s not completely accurate it has proven useful in identifying victims and putting away perpetrators behind bars. 2. Fingerprint Analysis There are considered to be hundreds of techniques in order to detect fingerprints, however, most of them are only for academic interest and there’s really only roughly 20 methods that are extremely accurate and used in fingerprint labs all over the world. This is because fingerprints are classified into three groups: three-dimensional plastic prints, patent prints, and latent prints that each vary depending on the type of surface the print was discovered on. The most common method used to convict criminals has been dusting where forensic scientists use black granular powder to locate the prints and then lift them with an adhesive tape, though the powder does have the potential to contaminate the evidence. 1. Luminol Spray Perhaps one of, if not, the most important techniques that forensic scientists have under their belt is luminol. This chemical can be traced back to 1928 when a German Chemist named H.O. Albrecht discovered that blood is able to make this chemical glow. See, the reason that this is possible is thanks to the iron that is found in the hemoglobin of blood and acts as a catalyst that sets off the chemical reaction. The chemical will then give off a blue glow but in order to be visible the room has to be dark enough and luminol only lasts up to 30 seconds so forensic photographers have to work very fast.
https://wn.com/14_Amazing_Forensic_Science_Techniques
This Was the Birth of DNA Profiling

This Was the Birth of DNA Profiling

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:21
  • Updated: 05 Jun 2012
  • views: 12044
videos
In 1983, police in Leicestershire, England struggle to make their case - until they join forces with scientists, who are just discovering the potential of DNA profiling.
https://wn.com/This_Was_The_Birth_Of_Dna_Profiling
Analysing forensic evidence | The Laboratory

Analysing forensic evidence | The Laboratory

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:14
  • Updated: 28 May 2015
  • views: 12600
videos
Dr Angela Gallop is chief executive at Forensic Access and a renowned forensic scientist. She has worked on many high-profile forensic investigations - including the murder of Stephen Lawrence - where painstaking laboratory analysis on trace evidence taken from the scene of a crime helped to provide key evidence in court. She reveals the variety of evidence investigated in the laboratory, from textile fibres, blood stain patterns and DNA profiling, and explains how lab analysis on evidence in the Coastal Path murder case helped to secure a conviction in court. Skip to: 0:50 Analysing textile fibres 1:55 Blood spatter and blood pattern analysis 4:05 DNA profiling Part of Forensics: the anatomy of crime exhibition: http://wellcomecollection.org/forensics Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/explorewellcome Find us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wellcomecollection
https://wn.com/Analysing_Forensic_Evidence_|_The_Laboratory
The Case Against DNA Evidence | FRONTLINE

The Case Against DNA Evidence | FRONTLINE

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:41
  • Updated: 24 Jun 2015
  • views: 17086
videos
Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW DNA evidence is the gold standard in many criminal cases. Most jurors and often the court of public opinion often believe if you can trace a crime back to a person's DNA, that person is caught red handed. But DNA evidence might not be as reliable as you think. FRONTLINE reporter Katie Worth takes you inside the case against DNA. Graphics by FableVision Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline Google+: https://plus.google.com/+frontline/posts FRONTLINE is streaming more than 180 films online, for free here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE's YouTube channel is provided by the Knight Foundation. FRONTLINE is made possible by PBS and CPB. Major support is provided by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Park Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Wyncote Foundation and Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.
https://wn.com/The_Case_Against_Dna_Evidence_|_Frontline
The Power of Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy - Adventures in Genomics

The Power of Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy - Adventures in Genomics

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:12
  • Updated: 18 Feb 2016
  • views: 31529
videos
In forensics, sometimes samples are so degraded that traditional DNA extractions and methods may not work. Jacques and Irene with Mitch Holland explain how high-throughput sequencing is helping us realize the power of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy — ultimately leading to the solving of more crimes. Used to identify the remains of Tsar Nicholas Romanov II, you’ll see how MtDNA heteroplasmy can now be used to routinely, detect, resolve and report using NGS technology, benefitting the forensics community for years to come. Subscribe to Illumina: http://bit.ly/IlluminaYouTube Links: Mitch Holland at Penn State, Eberly College of Science, Forensic Science – http://forensics.psu.edu/research/dr.-mitchell-holland Penn State University www.psu.edu For more info on applications in forensics – http://www.illumina.com/areas-of-interest/forensic-genomics.html For more info on applications in other areas http://www.illumina.com/science/publications/publications-review.html See all our Adventures in Genomics videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKRu7cmBQlah8wHBByBXEO0dNW-xNvvX_ http://www.Illumina.com
https://wn.com/The_Power_Of_Mitochondrial_Dna_Heteroplasmy_Adventures_In_Genomics
Killer Forensics - S02E06 ''DNA: The Truth Within''

Killer Forensics - S02E06 ''DNA: The Truth Within''

  • Order:
  • Duration: 44:15
  • Updated: 09 Jul 2015
  • views: 16603
videos
Five cases solved by DNA evidence.
https://wn.com/Killer_Forensics_S02E06_''Dna_The_Truth_Within''
How does DNA fingerprinting work? - Naked Science Scrapbook

How does DNA fingerprinting work? - Naked Science Scrapbook

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:27
  • Updated: 27 Oct 2011
  • views: 293551
videos
How do we tell people apart by using their DNA? From murder investigations to paternity testing, DNA fingerprinting is an essential tool in the modern world. But how is it carried out? Find out in the latest Naked Science Scrapbook!More videos and podcasts from http://www.thenakedscientists.com
https://wn.com/How_Does_Dna_Fingerprinting_Work_Naked_Science_Scrapbook
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