• Two-Minute Science Lesson: How Forensic DNA Testing Works

    An overview of how forensic DNA testing can identify individuals and overturn wrongful convictions. With Innocence Project Case Director Huy Dao.

    published: 21 Jul 2011
  • Inside the Crime Lab: Forensic Biology DNA Unit

    The Forensic Biology Unit of the Denver Police Crime Lab examines evidence recovered from crime scenes for potential biological matter. They identify biological fluids, then take swabs or cuttings from the evidence and process them for analysis. Cases that test positive in the Forensic Biology Unit go on to forensic DNA analysis. The goal of the DNA Unit is to develop DNA profiles from items of evidence and compare them to known DNA profiles from crime investigations.

    published: 23 Oct 2016
  • The Real Science of Forensics

    In this episode of SciShow, we’re going to investigate a murder. But first, we’re going to have to learn all about forensics, the use of science in criminal law -- and the real-life version is a little different from what you might see on TV. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhe...

    published: 02 Oct 2015
  • Forensic Science The Dark Side of Forensic DNA Documentary

    published: 19 Jul 2016
  • How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times

    Before DNA testing, prosecutors relied on less sophisticated forensic techniques, including microscopic hair analysis, to put criminals behind bars. But how reliable was hair analysis? Produced by: Retro Report Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1jwyfLt Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytimes Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes/ Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of th...

    published: 19 May 2014
  • DNA | Forensic DNA Investigation || Radcliffe Institute

    FORENSIC DNA INVESTIGATION Greg Hampikian (1:06), Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Joint appointment in Department of Criminal Justice, Director of the Idaho Innocence Project, Boise State University Introduced by Janet Rich-Edwards, Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    published: 22 Oct 2015
  • History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science.mp4

    History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science. From its beginnings to CODIS. The Timothy Spencer Case, DNA Data Banks, Paul B. Ferrara, Innocence Project, and Early Backlogs, ect.

    published: 06 May 2012
  • Exploring bias in forensic DNA profiling | Dan Krane | TEDxDayton

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The science of DNA profiling is sound, but much of what passes as DNA profiling is not scientific. Many testing labs resist interpreting evidence samples without having knowledge of a suspect's reference DNA profile. Blind interpretation of test results is possible and would greatly increase the reliability of the statistical weights given to DNA profile matches in some cases. Dan is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Wright State University where he has been a faculty member since 1993 and where he currently serves as the President of the Faculty. He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree for a double major in Biology and Chemistry from John Carroll University, and a Ph.D. in Bioche...

    published: 12 Jan 2015
  • DNA Analysis

    Please visit our website at http://www.nfstc.org DNA is life's blueprint, a molecule that encodes genetic instructions used in the development of all known living organisms and viruses. But how is DNA used in the field of forensic science? NFSTC presents "DNA Analysis," a brief explanation of what DNA is, how it functions, and the multi-step Forensic DNA Analysis process.

    published: 10 Jun 2014
  • How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? KS3 animation from Activate 3 Kerboodle

    Explaining DNA: how forensic investigators use DNA fingerprinting at a crime scene to identify the culprit. Find this and more KS3 animations on Activate 3 Kerboodle: Lessons, Resources and Assessment. Find out more about Activate at www.oxfordsecondary.co.uk/activate.

    published: 30 Oct 2014
  • Forensic DNA Mixups | Greg Hampikian | TEDxBoise

    DNA is seen as an ultimate tool-- an inarguable truth. It has the power to convict, and the power to exonerate. But in this lively talk, Dr. Greg Hampikian shows that even DNA can make mistakes. Dr. Hampikian is a professor of Biology and Criminal Justice at Boise State University.  A Charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, his research includes identifying the smallest DNA sequences absent from nature that he calls Nullomers. Using these sequences Dr. Hampikian has invented a method of tagging DNA samples to prevent contamination of forensic evidence, and 198 drugs that are effective against cancer cells. In 2013 he was awarded the Liberty Bell Award for his work in justice, and in 2014 the Idaho Innocence Project under his leadership freed Sarah Pearce after 12 years in Ida...

    published: 09 Feb 2015
  • Forensic DNA Analysis: DNA Replication Podcast

    Description

    published: 06 Mar 2015
  • Criminological And DNA Forensics Documentary

    When all venues of police investigations fall short and no clues left or evidence nor whiteness to testify to the ordeal done by the perpetrator, sometimes there would be no concrete fact to apprehend such criminal. However there would be only one single solution as alternative and this is "Forensic DNA Analysis", the technique that can draw biological evidence from tiniest stroke or simple touch of doer at crime scene......

    published: 14 Oct 2016
  • Using DNA to Identify People

    This lesson focuses on the molecular biology technique of DNA fingerprinting: what it is, how it works, and how the data from these experiments are used for paternity testing and forensics? DNA can be used to tell people apart because humans differ from each other based on either their DNA sequences or the lengths of repeated regions of DNA. Length differences are typically used in forensics and paternity testing. The technique of gel electrophoresis separates DNA by size, thus allowing people to be identified based on analyzing the lengths of their DNA. We discuss how gel electrophoresis works, and lab footage is shown of this technique being performed in real time. Students then analyze results from these experiments and work on case examples using DNA to match babies to parents and crim...

    published: 21 Dec 2015
  • Forensic DNA: Change is Constant, Science is Truth | Rich Guerrieri | TEDxColumbus

    Expert forensic scientist Rich Guerreri shares a personal journey through the history of DNA in America and the promise new DNA technology holds for identifying missing persons and exonerating wrongly incarcerated individuals. Rich received a M.S. in Forensic Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh in 1980, and presently serves as the Research Leader with Battelle Memorial Institute’s Applied Genomics Program, directing forensic and biometric initiatives for the development and implementation of the next-generation sequencing technology in support of the forensic DNA community. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

    published: 09 Dec 2015
  • Analysing forensic evidence | The Laboratory

    Dr Angela Gallop is chief executive at Forensic Access and a renowned forensic scientist. She has worked on many high-profile forensic investigations - including the murder of Stephen Lawrence - where painstaking laboratory analysis on trace evidence taken from the scene of a crime helped to provide key evidence in court. She reveals the variety of evidence investigated in the laboratory, from textile fibres, blood stain patterns and DNA profiling, and explains how lab analysis on evidence in the Coastal Path murder case helped to secure a conviction in court. Skip to: 0:50 Analysing textile fibres 1:55 Blood spatter and blood pattern analysis 4:05 DNA profiling Part of Forensics: the anatomy of crime exhibition: http://wellcomecollection.org/forensics Follow us on Twitter: http://twit...

    published: 28 May 2015
  • Forensic Science: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

    Forensic science used in criminal trials can be surprisingly unscientific. Maybe a new television procedural could help change the public perception. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight

    published: 02 Oct 2017
  • 14 Amazing Forensic Science Techniques

    Here are 14 of the most amazing science techniques and technology that lets us carbon date and even do age progression! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7. Ballistics This side of science involves everything that has to do with the flight, behavior, effects, and launching of projectiles such as gravity bombs and rockets but when most people say ballistics they’re referring to bullets. Ballistics is broken down into four main categories. These are internal ballistics, transitional ballistics, external ballistics, and terminal ballistics. In the field of forensics, ballistics is used to analyze the bullet itself and its impact to see if the information found can be used in a court of law. 6. DNA Sequencer This scientific device is used to help figure out the order in which...

    published: 09 Nov 2016
  • Forensic Biology (DNA and Serology) Evidence

    published: 23 Jan 2013
  • DNA Fingerprinting

    Paul Andersen describes the process of DNA fingerprinting and DNA profiling. He explains how variability in STRs can be used to identify individuals. He explains the importance of DNA fingerprinting in forensics and paternity cases. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License

    published: 12 May 2012
  • Killer Forensics - S02E06 ''DNA: The Truth Within''

    Five cases solved by DNA evidence.

    published: 09 Jul 2015
  • How does DNA fingerprinting work? - Naked Science Scrapbook

    How do we tell people apart by using their DNA? From murder investigations to paternity testing, DNA fingerprinting is an essential tool in the modern world. But how is it carried out? Find out in the latest Naked Science Scrapbook!More videos and podcasts from http://www.thenakedscientists.com

    published: 27 Oct 2011
  • Gun DNA "The Gun Forensics"

    http://www.youtube.com/WantedTVHQ https://twitter.com/WantedTVHQ https://www.facebook.com/WantedTVHQ Hosted by Sandra Sully, and reporter Matt Doran, Wanted will cover all types of unsolved crime, from cold-case murders to major assault, cybercrime, scams and criminals on the run. Wanted features a crack team of crime specialists including forensic anthropologist Dr Xanthe Mallet and experienced investigative crime reporter Neil Mercer. Highly decorated former Detective Superintendent Terry Dalton will also report, bringing a wealth of experience from more than 30 years with NSW Police.

    published: 19 Aug 2013
  • This Was the Birth of DNA Profiling

    In 1983, police in Leicestershire, England struggle to make their case - until they join forces with scientists, who are just discovering the potential of DNA profiling. From the Series: Catching Killers: DNA Profiling http://bit.ly/2gcbz9l

    published: 05 Jun 2012
developed with YouTube
Two-Minute Science Lesson: How Forensic DNA Testing Works

Two-Minute Science Lesson: How Forensic DNA Testing Works

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:55
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2011
  • views: 36018
videos
An overview of how forensic DNA testing can identify individuals and overturn wrongful convictions. With Innocence Project Case Director Huy Dao.
https://wn.com/Two_Minute_Science_Lesson_How_Forensic_Dna_Testing_Works
Inside the Crime Lab: Forensic Biology DNA Unit

Inside the Crime Lab: Forensic Biology DNA Unit

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:39
  • Updated: 23 Oct 2016
  • views: 2615
videos
The Forensic Biology Unit of the Denver Police Crime Lab examines evidence recovered from crime scenes for potential biological matter. They identify biological fluids, then take swabs or cuttings from the evidence and process them for analysis. Cases that test positive in the Forensic Biology Unit go on to forensic DNA analysis. The goal of the DNA Unit is to develop DNA profiles from items of evidence and compare them to known DNA profiles from crime investigations.
https://wn.com/Inside_The_Crime_Lab_Forensic_Biology_Dna_Unit
The Real Science of Forensics

The Real Science of Forensics

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:24
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2015
  • views: 540678
videos
In this episode of SciShow, we’re going to investigate a murder. But first, we’re going to have to learn all about forensics, the use of science in criminal law -- and the real-life version is a little different from what you might see on TV. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/04/fbi-plans-have-52-million-photos-its-ngi-face-recognition-database-next-year http://www.alternet.org/story/153664/5_things_you_should_know_about_the_fbi's_massive_new_biometric_database http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/13/us/facial-recognition-software-moves-from-overseas-wars-to-local-police.html http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/15/opinion/how-the-fbi-uses-facial-recognition-analysis.html?_r=2 http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/8/5982727/face-wreck-how-advanced-tech-comes-up-short-for-police http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/genetic/dna-evidence.htm http://www.scientific.org/tutorials/articles/riley/riley.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/20205874 http://www.mlo-online.com/articles/201404/str-typing-method-and-applications.php http://www.cstl.nist.gov/strbase/pub_pres/Butler_BiotechniquesSuppl_Oct2007.pdf http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/facial-recognition1.htm http://www.mitchpileggi.net/Deep_Background/resources/forensics/bodies.htm https://books.google.com/books?id=adKcM055ERoC&pg=PT265 http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f02/web2/wcarroll.html http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/43078/stop-believing-tvs-lies-the-real-truth-about-enhancing-images/ http://nzic.org.nz/ChemProcesses/biotech/12A.pdf
https://wn.com/The_Real_Science_Of_Forensics
Forensic Science The Dark Side of Forensic DNA Documentary

Forensic Science The Dark Side of Forensic DNA Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 44:37
  • Updated: 19 Jul 2016
  • views: 1792
videos
https://wn.com/Forensic_Science_The_Dark_Side_Of_Forensic_Dna_Documentary
How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times

How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:57
  • Updated: 19 May 2014
  • views: 25871
videos
Before DNA testing, prosecutors relied on less sophisticated forensic techniques, including microscopic hair analysis, to put criminals behind bars. But how reliable was hair analysis? Produced by: Retro Report Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1jwyfLt Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytimes Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes/ Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. How DNA Changed the World of Forensics | Retro Report | The New York Times http://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
https://wn.com/How_Dna_Changed_The_World_Of_Forensics_|_Retro_Report_|_The_New_York_Times
DNA | Forensic DNA Investigation || Radcliffe Institute

DNA | Forensic DNA Investigation || Radcliffe Institute

  • Order:
  • Duration: 44:42
  • Updated: 22 Oct 2015
  • views: 3907
videos
FORENSIC DNA INVESTIGATION Greg Hampikian (1:06), Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Joint appointment in Department of Criminal Justice, Director of the Idaho Innocence Project, Boise State University Introduced by Janet Rich-Edwards, Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
https://wn.com/Dna_|_Forensic_Dna_Investigation_||_Radcliffe_Institute
History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science.mp4

History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science.mp4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 46:49
  • Updated: 06 May 2012
  • views: 46052
videos
History Channel on the Early Implementation of DNA in Forensic Science. From its beginnings to CODIS. The Timothy Spencer Case, DNA Data Banks, Paul B. Ferrara, Innocence Project, and Early Backlogs, ect.
https://wn.com/History_Channel_On_The_Early_Implementation_Of_Dna_In_Forensic_Science.Mp4
Exploring bias in forensic DNA profiling | Dan Krane | TEDxDayton

Exploring bias in forensic DNA profiling | Dan Krane | TEDxDayton

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:05
  • Updated: 12 Jan 2015
  • views: 11137
videos
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The science of DNA profiling is sound, but much of what passes as DNA profiling is not scientific. Many testing labs resist interpreting evidence samples without having knowledge of a suspect's reference DNA profile. Blind interpretation of test results is possible and would greatly increase the reliability of the statistical weights given to DNA profile matches in some cases. Dan is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Wright State University where he has been a faculty member since 1993 and where he currently serves as the President of the Faculty. He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree for a double major in Biology and Chemistry from John Carroll University, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the Cell and Molecular Biology Department at the Pennsylvania State University in 1990. Dan is also the president and a co-founder of Forensic Bioinformatic Services Inc., where he has overseen the development and implementation of software designed to automatically and objectively review STR DNA testing results. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
https://wn.com/Exploring_Bias_In_Forensic_Dna_Profiling_|_Dan_Krane_|_Tedxdayton
DNA Analysis

DNA Analysis

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:47
  • Updated: 10 Jun 2014
  • views: 16696
videos
Please visit our website at http://www.nfstc.org DNA is life's blueprint, a molecule that encodes genetic instructions used in the development of all known living organisms and viruses. But how is DNA used in the field of forensic science? NFSTC presents "DNA Analysis," a brief explanation of what DNA is, how it functions, and the multi-step Forensic DNA Analysis process.
https://wn.com/Dna_Analysis
How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? KS3 animation from Activate 3 Kerboodle

How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? KS3 animation from Activate 3 Kerboodle

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:08
  • Updated: 30 Oct 2014
  • views: 108030
videos
Explaining DNA: how forensic investigators use DNA fingerprinting at a crime scene to identify the culprit. Find this and more KS3 animations on Activate 3 Kerboodle: Lessons, Resources and Assessment. Find out more about Activate at www.oxfordsecondary.co.uk/activate.
https://wn.com/How_Is_Dna_Fingerprinting_Used_To_Identify_A_Criminal_Ks3_Animation_From_Activate_3_Kerboodle
Forensic DNA Mixups | Greg Hampikian | TEDxBoise

Forensic DNA Mixups | Greg Hampikian | TEDxBoise

  • Order:
  • Duration: 18:42
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2015
  • views: 9815
videos
DNA is seen as an ultimate tool-- an inarguable truth. It has the power to convict, and the power to exonerate. But in this lively talk, Dr. Greg Hampikian shows that even DNA can make mistakes. Dr. Hampikian is a professor of Biology and Criminal Justice at Boise State University.  A Charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, his research includes identifying the smallest DNA sequences absent from nature that he calls Nullomers. Using these sequences Dr. Hampikian has invented a method of tagging DNA samples to prevent contamination of forensic evidence, and 198 drugs that are effective against cancer cells. In 2013 he was awarded the Liberty Bell Award for his work in justice, and in 2014 the Idaho Innocence Project under his leadership freed Sarah Pearce after 12 years in Idaho prisons.  He is a renowned forensic DNA expert and has worked on high profile cases around the world including that of Amanda Knox. He has helped with more than a dozen exonerations, and worked on hundreds of cases, recently helping the French police use Familiar DNA to solve a decade old murder. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/Forensic_Dna_Mixups_|_Greg_Hampikian_|_Tedxboise
Forensic DNA Analysis: DNA Replication Podcast

Forensic DNA Analysis: DNA Replication Podcast

  • Order:
  • Duration: 18:21
  • Updated: 06 Mar 2015
  • views: 186
videos https://wn.com/Forensic_Dna_Analysis_Dna_Replication_Podcast
Criminological And DNA Forensics Documentary

Criminological And DNA Forensics Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 43:57
  • Updated: 14 Oct 2016
  • views: 694
videos
When all venues of police investigations fall short and no clues left or evidence nor whiteness to testify to the ordeal done by the perpetrator, sometimes there would be no concrete fact to apprehend such criminal. However there would be only one single solution as alternative and this is "Forensic DNA Analysis", the technique that can draw biological evidence from tiniest stroke or simple touch of doer at crime scene......
https://wn.com/Criminological_And_Dna_Forensics_Documentary
Using DNA to Identify People

Using DNA to Identify People

  • Order:
  • Duration: 45:49
  • Updated: 21 Dec 2015
  • views: 2072
videos
This lesson focuses on the molecular biology technique of DNA fingerprinting: what it is, how it works, and how the data from these experiments are used for paternity testing and forensics? DNA can be used to tell people apart because humans differ from each other based on either their DNA sequences or the lengths of repeated regions of DNA. Length differences are typically used in forensics and paternity testing. The technique of gel electrophoresis separates DNA by size, thus allowing people to be identified based on analyzing the lengths of their DNA. We discuss how gel electrophoresis works, and lab footage is shown of this technique being performed in real time. Students then analyze results from these experiments and work on case examples using DNA to match babies to parents and crime scene evidence to suspects. In terms of prerequisite knowledge, it would be ideal if students already have learned that DNA is the genetic material, and that DNA is made up of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs. It also would help if students already know that each human has two versions of every piece of DNA in their genome, one from mom and one from dad. Necessary supplies for this lesson include only paper and writing utensils, and the ability to print out or display the provided handouts. The lesson will take about one class period, with roughly 30 minutes of footage and 30 minutes of activities. At the end of the lesson, an optional video tour of the Cambridge Police Department’s Identification Lab is provided, giving students an opportunity to see the equipment used in crime labs to isolate both real fingerprints and DNA for DNA fingerprint analysis, from evidence found at crime scenes. Watch optional video (http://blossoms.mit.edu/videos/files/english/visit_police_identification_lab_english_flash): Visit to Police Identification Lab in Cambridge, MA to see how DNA is extracted from evidence at crime scenes. For more information: ‪http://blossoms.mit.edu/videos/lessons/using_dna_identify_people‬
https://wn.com/Using_Dna_To_Identify_People
Forensic DNA: Change is Constant, Science is Truth | Rich Guerrieri | TEDxColumbus

Forensic DNA: Change is Constant, Science is Truth | Rich Guerrieri | TEDxColumbus

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:33
  • Updated: 09 Dec 2015
  • views: 3658
videos
Expert forensic scientist Rich Guerreri shares a personal journey through the history of DNA in America and the promise new DNA technology holds for identifying missing persons and exonerating wrongly incarcerated individuals. Rich received a M.S. in Forensic Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh in 1980, and presently serves as the Research Leader with Battelle Memorial Institute’s Applied Genomics Program, directing forensic and biometric initiatives for the development and implementation of the next-generation sequencing technology in support of the forensic DNA community. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/Forensic_Dna_Change_Is_Constant,_Science_Is_Truth_|_Rich_Guerrieri_|_Tedxcolumbus
Analysing forensic evidence | The Laboratory

Analysing forensic evidence | The Laboratory

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:14
  • Updated: 28 May 2015
  • views: 16563
videos
Dr Angela Gallop is chief executive at Forensic Access and a renowned forensic scientist. She has worked on many high-profile forensic investigations - including the murder of Stephen Lawrence - where painstaking laboratory analysis on trace evidence taken from the scene of a crime helped to provide key evidence in court. She reveals the variety of evidence investigated in the laboratory, from textile fibres, blood stain patterns and DNA profiling, and explains how lab analysis on evidence in the Coastal Path murder case helped to secure a conviction in court. Skip to: 0:50 Analysing textile fibres 1:55 Blood spatter and blood pattern analysis 4:05 DNA profiling Part of Forensics: the anatomy of crime exhibition: http://wellcomecollection.org/forensics Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/explorewellcome Find us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wellcomecollection
https://wn.com/Analysing_Forensic_Evidence_|_The_Laboratory
Forensic Science: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Forensic Science: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 18:51
  • Updated: 02 Oct 2017
  • views: 4661252
videos
Forensic science used in criminal trials can be surprisingly unscientific. Maybe a new television procedural could help change the public perception. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
https://wn.com/Forensic_Science_Last_Week_Tonight_With_John_Oliver_(Hbo)
14 Amazing Forensic Science Techniques

14 Amazing Forensic Science Techniques

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:49
  • Updated: 09 Nov 2016
  • views: 48331
videos
Here are 14 of the most amazing science techniques and technology that lets us carbon date and even do age progression! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7. Ballistics This side of science involves everything that has to do with the flight, behavior, effects, and launching of projectiles such as gravity bombs and rockets but when most people say ballistics they’re referring to bullets. Ballistics is broken down into four main categories. These are internal ballistics, transitional ballistics, external ballistics, and terminal ballistics. In the field of forensics, ballistics is used to analyze the bullet itself and its impact to see if the information found can be used in a court of law. 6. DNA Sequencer This scientific device is used to help figure out the order in which the four bases of DNA are arranged in in a specific sample of DNA. For those of you that don’t remember the four bases from high school biology, they are guanine, cytosine, adenine, and thymine. Crime lab technicians and forensic scientists alike use a DNA sequencer when their DNA sample is too deteriorated in order to get a special DNA pattern that can aid in identifying the criminal. This special DNA pattern is called a “read”. 5. Hair Analysis One of the key elements that usually ends up putting criminals in jail is something that they’ve managed to completely overlook. That one small detail that plays a crucial part in their conviction is DNA. DNA evidence can range from bodily fluids such as blood or seminal fluids and fingerprints. However, clothing fibers and hair are just as important. The average person loses around 60-100 hairs per day and there’s no way you could keep track of where they fall. This works in favor of the forensics team. It was recently announced that human hair protein could potentially replace DNA as a key tool in forensics because of special markers that could allow the hair to distinguish an individual from a large group of people, say one million. 4. Polymerase Chain Reaction Abbreviated as PCR, the polymerase chain reaction technique was created by Kary Mullis back in the 1980’s and has gone on to be used in many different applications such as molecular biology and forensic science. Basically what PCR does is that it takes a single copy of DNA and replicates it around thousands to millions of times enough to where forensic scientists are able to successfully test it to match the DNA evidence of the potential suspect. This was a major breakthrough for cases that didn’t have enough DNA evidence to solve their cases and allowed these cases to be solved decades after they were committed. 3. Forensic Facial Reconstruction The first time a facial reconstruction was done was back in 1883 and then again in 1895. This technique combines several different fieldsー anthropology, anatomy, osteology, forensic science, and artistry in order to help solve the identity of someone that isn’t known by using their skeletal remains. This technique is quite controversial as it does prove to be somewhat problematic. Facial tissue thickness is the main issue that plagues this method but also the methodological standardization of the individual’s facial features. Even though it’s not completely accurate it has proven useful in identifying victims and putting away perpetrators behind bars. 2. Fingerprint Analysis There are considered to be hundreds of techniques in order to detect fingerprints, however, most of them are only for academic interest and there’s really only roughly 20 methods that are extremely accurate and used in fingerprint labs all over the world. This is because fingerprints are classified into three groups: three-dimensional plastic prints, patent prints, and latent prints that each vary depending on the type of surface the print was discovered on. The most common method used to convict criminals has been dusting where forensic scientists use black granular powder to locate the prints and then lift them with an adhesive tape, though the powder does have the potential to contaminate the evidence. 1. Luminol Spray Perhaps one of, if not, the most important techniques that forensic scientists have under their belt is luminol. This chemical can be traced back to 1928 when a German Chemist named H.O. Albrecht discovered that blood is able to make this chemical glow. See, the reason that this is possible is thanks to the iron that is found in the hemoglobin of blood and acts as a catalyst that sets off the chemical reaction. The chemical will then give off a blue glow but in order to be visible the room has to be dark enough and luminol only lasts up to 30 seconds so forensic photographers have to work very fast.
https://wn.com/14_Amazing_Forensic_Science_Techniques
Forensic Biology (DNA and Serology) Evidence

Forensic Biology (DNA and Serology) Evidence

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  • Duration: 3:16
  • Updated: 23 Jan 2013
  • views: 6789
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https://wn.com/Forensic_Biology_(Dna_And_Serology)_Evidence
DNA Fingerprinting

DNA Fingerprinting

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  • Duration: 6:10
  • Updated: 12 May 2012
  • views: 350511
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Paul Andersen describes the process of DNA fingerprinting and DNA profiling. He explains how variability in STRs can be used to identify individuals. He explains the importance of DNA fingerprinting in forensics and paternity cases. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
https://wn.com/Dna_Fingerprinting
Killer Forensics - S02E06 ''DNA: The Truth Within''

Killer Forensics - S02E06 ''DNA: The Truth Within''

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  • Duration: 44:15
  • Updated: 09 Jul 2015
  • views: 20574
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Five cases solved by DNA evidence.
https://wn.com/Killer_Forensics_S02E06_''Dna_The_Truth_Within''
How does DNA fingerprinting work? - Naked Science Scrapbook

How does DNA fingerprinting work? - Naked Science Scrapbook

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  • Duration: 5:27
  • Updated: 27 Oct 2011
  • views: 310256
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How do we tell people apart by using their DNA? From murder investigations to paternity testing, DNA fingerprinting is an essential tool in the modern world. But how is it carried out? Find out in the latest Naked Science Scrapbook!More videos and podcasts from http://www.thenakedscientists.com
https://wn.com/How_Does_Dna_Fingerprinting_Work_Naked_Science_Scrapbook
Gun DNA "The Gun Forensics"

Gun DNA "The Gun Forensics"

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  • Duration: 4:45
  • Updated: 19 Aug 2013
  • views: 3649
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http://www.youtube.com/WantedTVHQ https://twitter.com/WantedTVHQ https://www.facebook.com/WantedTVHQ Hosted by Sandra Sully, and reporter Matt Doran, Wanted will cover all types of unsolved crime, from cold-case murders to major assault, cybercrime, scams and criminals on the run. Wanted features a crack team of crime specialists including forensic anthropologist Dr Xanthe Mallet and experienced investigative crime reporter Neil Mercer. Highly decorated former Detective Superintendent Terry Dalton will also report, bringing a wealth of experience from more than 30 years with NSW Police.
https://wn.com/Gun_Dna_The_Gun_Forensics
This Was the Birth of DNA Profiling

This Was the Birth of DNA Profiling

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  • Duration: 3:21
  • Updated: 05 Jun 2012
  • views: 13398
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In 1983, police in Leicestershire, England struggle to make their case - until they join forces with scientists, who are just discovering the potential of DNA profiling. From the Series: Catching Killers: DNA Profiling http://bit.ly/2gcbz9l
https://wn.com/This_Was_The_Birth_Of_Dna_Profiling
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